Thursday, 15 March 2012

Hot Dogues

There were a lot of hot Dogues at Crufts on the Saturday - at least on the benches -  as the following pictures show.

Now it was warm in the NEC (and I hear that one steward refused to open a door to increase airflow as he was trying to prevent dogs and owners leaving before the permitted 4pm). But as you can see, several have stenotic nares - and although some are better than others, none here has the truly wide-open pipes one would like to see.  This is not a fault currently highlighted on the KC's Breedwatch but I think it should be. These are big, heavy dogs with short faces and skin folds. They need open airways to help them keep cool. And we know it's possible in a dog with this conformation - most of the Neopolitan Mastiffs are fine in this respect.






75 comments:

  1. The owner announced on facebook she had overheated shortly after the event so you cant blame people for thinking that was the case.

    it is very sad that something could happen to any of us so quickly

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  2. are you all sheep this so called woman in the media has already made your mind up for you and led you to make assumptions that were are all the same, Jemima im personally inviting you to spend a few months with me and my dogs bring your camera crew as well

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    1. Now there is a gauntlet I suggest you pick it up Jemima and have the balls to report back here.

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    2. If Jemima doesn't this will show that she is simply interested in sensationalism

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    3. I support both you anonymous commentors!!!! If Jemima really wants to see breeders .. she should look at LL points of view and not-only the jounalist sensationalist views that get earn her living!!!

      would also like to point out.. the first couple of pics of dogues dont look 'standard' at all. they look a bit like mixes If I am honest! look unhealthier than some of the others you pictures due to excessive wrinkles!

      some of these dogues look stunning. just enough wrinkling to show that they are what they are.. but not flopping over everywhere...

      although some are downright ugly ! Im sure they are lovely dogs though :)

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    4. Thanks, Jemima, for the Dogue pics. My Dogue has breathing attacks at times due to the pinches nares that I'm always so afraid he's going to expire. Some of you other commentors...you guys really sound like Pitbull owners!

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    5. Why do I get the uncanny feeling that all of the anon posters in this particular thread are the same person in disguise. ;)

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  3. I wonder if you have the owners permission to have these pictures on your site?

    I believe the Crufts schedule states - "There is no objection to the general public taking photographs or video film of general views of the Show, provided that these are for private use only"

    This is NOT private use

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  4. A gauntlet to prove what... that some of the above dogs don't have wide open nostrils?

    The only "charge" above is that wide open nares are a good thing in a dog that is more likely to overheat than some others. I don't need to spend "months with a camera crew" (although we are better company than you might imagine, honest...) to either prove or disprove that - although if Anon would like to reveal their identity, I would happily visit if not too far and on condition that they PUT THE PITCH FORK DOWN.

    Really, Dogue breeders, rather than harangue me for pointing out the obvious why don't you, for instance, lobby your breed club to be more proactive on health?

    http://www.thekarltonindex.com/wordpress/?page_id=138

    A proper health survey might even be able to challenge the KC survey which found a median longevity of 3 years 10months in the breed. (Very small sample size so perfectly possible it is wrong.)

    Also why no mention of lymphoma on the UK breed club website? Happy to be corrected, but I understand it to be a breed problem.

    Jemima

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    1. @Jemima Hear..hear!! This is not simply a 'shiny object' for a journalist. All you breeders, showers and breed lovers start walking the talk and fix your houses if not for your own pompous prestige, then for the animals. Relinquish your vanity and prove your interest is in the dogs' well-being first and foremost..then make pretty on the structure of health. And frankly most dog enthusiast couldn't really care less of what you think is pedestal fodder. Healthy breeds FIRST..the first standard should be health standard.

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    2. Jemima, blunt question, did you or did you not get consent from these dogs owners to post their photos? If you didn't, you can be in some serious hot water. Especially, taking photos, without permission, so you can post negative views about the dogs and their breed.

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    3. I believe the average lifespan for a DDB is 6 years.

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    4. Jemima can legally use the photos. It seems like this is brought up by pissy people in every single post that involves a photo of a dog that isn't commercial.

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  5. A carefully 'selected' choice of images - not very representative of the 180 dogues present on the day though are they?

    In regard to lymphoma - what statistical evidence are you basing your comment on?

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    1. Great question!! And great point!!

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    2. There is no statistical evidence that I know of - but then there isn't for many canine problems, something that hopefully will change now that VetCompass is up and running (http://www.rvc.ac.uk/VetCOMPASS/). But it is certainly a recognised problem in the US dogs:

      http://www.ddbs.org/Health/LymphomaStudy.htm

      Jemima

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    3. Jemima,
      I am sure you are already aware of this but the result is not particularly convenient for you, Pet Plan provide statistic for claims made and Dogue de Bordeaux are shown to be below average for Lymphoma.

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    4. I was not aware of this. In fact, getting any statistics out of PetPlan is usually skin to getting blood out of a stone. But perhaps a different insurance company? Do you have a link or a reference?

      Jemima

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    5. You already know I do not have a link as they are not published online that's why you are asking, however they are widely available to vets and via the AHT I thought you might have done some better research.

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    6. They absolutely are not available, Anon - unless this is a brand new development. PetPlan release their statistics to no-one. And it's not for the want of asking. Several researchers have tried - from Bruce Fogle to Professor Sir Patrick Bateson.

      Hell, I'm going to be bold on this one. You don't actually have a shred of evidence that lymphoma claims for the Dogue de Bordeaux are below average, do you?

      Jemima

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    7. The ddbs link states "Recent data from the DDBSA "Cause of Death Survey" indicates that lymphoma is now the second leading cause of death in our breed."

      Is that not enough evidence to be concerned about the problem?

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    8. Lymphoma in the DDB is the current leading cancer in the breed (it's the current leading cancer in ALL breeds over 100 pounds/45 kilos world wide). It's actually above average for the breed, way above average. It is so prevelant in the breed that there is breed specific cancer research being conducted (the ddb has a much smaller gene pool world wide then lets say, a golden retreiver or German Shepard Dog, and because of this, it should dramaticaly help cancer research).
      As for Petplan and other insurance companies, I honestly doubt they will give out information. Heck, I was just speaking (on facebook) with 3 people last week who's dogues were diagnosed with lymphoma and NOT ONE was told about Chemo or any other treatements, all 3 were told there was no treatment available (and all 3 were had pet insurance). I find it troubling and sad that the vets (in the UK) are not telling people that there are options, there are treatments that can keep your dogue comfortable and happy for a longer period of time.
      Having lost 2 ddb's to lymphoma, and have another going thru chemo right now (none are/were related), I have done a LOT of research and have spoke to several of the leading oncologists in the US. Being active and outspoken within and outside of the US breed club, I hear of a lot, way too much cancer in the breed and have to think that it's something more "environmental" than anything else (look at those commercial foods we put into our dogues, the fillers, binders, soy, corn, wheat, all things our dogs are not meant to process, look at the over vaccinations).....

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    9. Lymphoma is a common cancer in dogs, but to say that it is the most common one in all dog breeds over 100 lbs is clearly wrong. Counterexamples that come to mind would be malignant histiocytosis in the Bernese Mountain Dog or osteosarcoma in the Deerhound.

      Delete
    10. My apologies for not responding sooner however I have better things to do,
      You state they do not have the stats but what evidence do you have that they don't maybe they just chose not to share them with you. These stats also show shar-pei as average for skin problems this will be another statistic you are not too keen on hearing....

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    11. @Anon 1.51

      If you have done a LOT of research and come to the conclusion that the problem is industrial dog food and vaccines, clearly the quantity of your research is no indication of its quality. Kinda doubt you got that information from the leading oncologists though.

      On a side note, if a dog's immune system can't even tolerate routine vaccines, that dog probably should not be bred from.

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  6. These dogs are more brachycephalic than the ones I've seen over here.

    Of course, the ones over here haven't really been owned by show people. This breed had a mini popularity boom in the United States, due to one appearing in a movie with Tom Hanks. After that movie came out, there were dozens of breeders selling these dogs in dog magazines.

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    1. But after that the DDB lost favor, which is a good thing, and they are rare to see in the US.

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    2. Not really. They aren't like Rottweilers, but you see them from time to time. Molosser-type dogs are always relatively popular in the US. The mastiff (from England) is much, much more popular in the US than anywhere else in the world.

      I would hardly say the dogue is rare in the US. The AKC registration stats don't give a full picture of them. It's a new AKC breed.

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    3. If it were truly rare, I wouldn't be able to find available dogues so quickly:
      http://dogs.oodle.com/dogue_de_bordeaux/for-sale/

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    4. The dog that played Hooch lived a long time:

      http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1212798/

      He was 13 when he died.

      It's a terrible Tom Hanks movie, but it's a great dog movie. I watch it for Beasley.

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    5. Cinnamon2005, the DDB is NOT rare in the US. Rescue is assisting over 400 a year, there are dozens of puppy mills that have had the breed for more than 5 generations, there are several hundred back yard breeders of the DDB in the US (and only a couple dozen reputable ones that I am aware of)...... By no means, are they "rare".. Haven't been rare for a long time. There was a HUGE influx of ddb's brought over in recent years (since AKC full recognition).

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    6. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1212798/
      Don't know where they got the stats, but I honestly doubt these are correct....... There is no way any of the dogs from the movie were 10 when the movie came out, they were all under 4 years old I believe (and there were 3, plus the puppy at the end).

      And as for live expectancy, 6-10 is average. The problem with the DDBSA's stats is that when people lose their dog young, they are more likely to go out, looking for a reason, come across the cause of death survey and complete it, those with "old dogues" don't go looking (I know of over 30 who lived well past 10, yet none of them are in the survey except the 12-14 year old rescue that I owned for almost 11 years). And really, the survey is only a very small percentage of the dogues out there (under 400 over the last 10 years). Hopefully, more people world wide will start participating in the survey!!!!

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  7. i have the owner on my Facebook and she did not announce the dog over heated. people need to get facts correct before making such statements

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    1. sorry but that was definatly said. I am reading the post now ! they may not have known the cause at the time but it was said at 20.58 that she had over heated. Then later that she had sadly been put to sleep but no other cause was mentioned until beverely cuddy posted on the 11th

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    2. I believe the problem involved laryngeal paralysis - that would certainly cause overheating. There does not appear to be any evidence, however, that it was the other way round.

      Jemima

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    3. When the owners daughter who is a child might i add, said about overheating Know one knew what the cause was at the time. I was with the owners Marley and the vet while the owners 2 Children were out in the waiting area i gather now on her phone letting her friends know about Marley still thinking she may have overheated as the owners were in the dark for a few hours to what the real cause was as the main concern was to get Marley treated not to jump straight on fb to get her facts right as soon as we had them.
      So why cant people now let the owners grieve for the loss of there beloved family pet!!!

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    4. Did anyone watching the Crufts footage see when the More4 presenter (don't know her name) interviewed the Crufts vet (don't know his name either) regarding what happened to the dog? She clearly had news herself that it was laryngeal paralysis and expected that the vet would be able to shed some light on what had happened. He arrogantly said that they didn't know yet, and the presenter was visibly embarrassed as she went on to state that it was said to be laryngeal paralysis and her condolences to the owners. To her credit she handled it pretty well, but it made him look like even more of an arrogant tool than he already did in my opinion.

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    5. Please let Marley rest in peace and her owners grieve in peace.

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    6. You're so right.

      RIP little Marley.

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  8. I applaud all breeders who are facing upto the problems this breed is suffering. But too many I fear simply bury their heads in the sand.
    Closed nostrils ARE a problem. Lymphoma, HD, ED, Kidney problems, eye problems, heart problems, skin problems...and the list goes ON. Of course we can't speak about it without getting abuse. But never the less it is true. The lifespan is terribly short.
    To change we need to open our eyes. There are many people in the breed who have their eyes open. But sadly more that keep them closed. Its a pity for the dogs - they deserve much more. Perhaps more attention on the breed would not be a bad thing for the longterm benefits.
    To fix the problems you need to face the problems. Sadly it seems that some can't even see the problems.

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  9. @Barry, I agree with your comment to a certain degree. Breeders SHOULD be in the business of breeding to better the. Reed and because they care about the dog and the breed itself, BUT, there still are legal issues that make what Jemima has done illegal, especially given the fact that she's used certain photos to make all the breed look bad, and if she hasn't gotten consent from these dogs owners, that's not only illegal but without morals. If one of these were YOUR dog, Barry, would your comment be different?? I'm thinking the answer would more than likely be...yes.

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    1. No is my answer .. don't speak for me or my proposed integrity..I would have an overwhelming feeling of embarrassment but only after grieving, especially from (supposedly) having knowledge of potential health issues of the breed ..I can't understand or appreciate the concern of photo rights..a dog died, breeds are at compromise and you are concerned about propagation of photos of a showing dog in a Crufts show, a dog, where in any other venue - I would think - one would be quite receptive to display the vanity of such. The pompous never ceases. Let's try and focus on the well-being and health of our animals and forget about human based dignities or presumed dignities in this respect. Stop propping up human insecurities in the wake of our dogs' demise.

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  10. Illegal?

    I don't think so....

    Jemima

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  11. If you post a photo, Jemima, with the intent of a negative attachment, yes, that is illegal because of something called "slander". Have you educated yourself at all upon this subject?? I think you certainly should if you're going to be crossing this line. Just because not a whole lot of people utilize the legal system when it comes to this subject does not mean it does not exsist. I'm thru here, it is not my job to educate you, you would think that, for someone who has a blog, you would at LEAST want to have correct infomation so as to make you not look completely ignorant and driven by some emotion, namely hate. I'm sorry you've got something going on in YOUR life that makes you feel the need to lash out at others, including innocent canines. I hope you find some solution to your problems because your actions are in bad form. Period.

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    1. Er, you cannot slander a dog!

      Jemima

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    2. I believe that would be Libel

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    3. And, of course, you can't libel a dog, either.

      Jemima

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  12. It is only slander is proved to be untrue...
    As taken from the Oxford dictionary... "the action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person’s reputation"

    False being the crucial word here

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  13. The solution Anonymous 8:51am is to ignore the yellow journalist. Her second round didn't even make it to the big time, and is quickly being forgotten. She is not a breeder, never will be, doesn't have the guts, just likes taking pot shots from her bully pulpit (pun intended).
    IGNORE JH and she'll eventually slink back into her AR cave. And if you see her at a show, call security and have her removed for illegally taking pics or for pretending to be a journalist.

    Meantime, all the breeders who care about what happened at Crufts, and its fallout, are on the Exhibitor's Choice and Voice FB page. There are some great ideas, loads of brilliant people (not a pretend journalist who obviously peed her pants in excitement of dogs being thrown our for old non-genetic injuries) who've been discussing how to change things in a positive way. It is about the dogs, and all responsible breeders know that. However, we weren't born experts in genetics, and since even the experts disagree, it's not always easy to make good decisions (which may only be known as good or bad much later in one's breeding program).

    Get on the FB page, on your breed pages, figure out how to save the breeds and stay away from the AR's here, unless you just want to occasionally spy on what they're up to ;o). That's how I know JH cares about her fame, and only pretends to care about the dogs. She's had so much fun with photoshop and making dogs look much worse than they are - and what's with acting like a picture of a sleeping dog is sinister? Only the yellowist of AR journalists would put out 14 pages of glee-filled slams at the dog show world...nope, it's not about the dogs at all with her, or she'd have been a breeder.

    Linda

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    1. Linda, with all due respect, you represent everything that is wrong in the world of purebred dogs. You are the old guard. Your outdated ideas are being challenged by Jemima and you are reacting in an infantile manner. Jemima cares about the dogs--you do not. You care about not having to make changes to the way you've always done things, even though science does not support it and the dogs are suffering for it.

      If it was indeed an "old eye injury" which disqualified the bulldog, then why on earth haven't the owners released the vet report? Honestly, how gullible are you??

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    2. Linda..what does expert have to do with anything..a grade school science class are likely aware of the consequences of inbreeding. Regardless, shouldn't any breeder of years experience rationalize the detriment that breeding grandfathers with second generation off-spring or worse..but if you ignore experience and continue to ever-increase latitudes of acceptance towards detriment then you can't be classified as brilliant..you can't even coddle the 'ignorant' card as experience removes that play..what is left but incriminating knowledge and a trophy.

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  14. As a member of a family orientated around dogues , and a friend to many others, ( a young one may i just add ) i find this truly despicable , how can you slate a breed like this without knowing enough about them? ive been with dogues now for around four years, and i could put you right on half of your comments Jemima , while i was at crufts , over a two day span saturday-sunday , i saw not only most of the big breeds being hot , but most of the little breeds aswell , did you not pick up on this? i think its quite cruel how you are singling out the dogues because of a dogue having to be put down , a dogue of which i know by the way , and it was a shock seeming as we saw her just a few hours ago , yes the breed may not be amazingly healthy, but it isnt exactly bad, and the overheating has nothing to do with the breed or their flipping nostrils , I was hot at crufts with only a thin t-shirt on , and im a human! Imagine how hot it would of been for the dogs! Personally i think you should go look at the other breeds aswell , i saw atleast the Rottweilers (not to single them out as i love the dog) and other types of mastiff and big breed dogs that were very hot , this is an ERROR on CRUFTS and the staff at the NEC , there was not enough ventilation for the dogs OR humans alike.

    Sort it out.

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    1. Ive had dogues for 10 years. She is right what she says!!!! It needs FIXING not sweeping under the carpet.

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    2. 10 years you say? would you mind mentioning which kennel you belong to so i can check that information? im not saying it doesnt need fixing, but it cant all be blamed on the "dogs nostrils not being wide enough" because while you say that, you could also be saying they need bigger lungs? and why dont you start trying to breed in "bigger nostrils" if youve owned dogues for so long?

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    3. Oh come on for christs sake! Breeder bitchiness again. It doesn't matter how long you have owned the breed - 3 years or 13. Who cares. Fact is the breed is crippled with issues. More cropping up all the time. How many dogs just went to sleep and never woke up. How many get 'stung by bees' How many just drop down dead at 4-5 years old? Its not acceptable. Nostrils are just one part of a huge problem and I thank God that there are breeders out there who can see it, and who are trying their best to improve it. People who bury their heads in the sand with their perfect dogs are THE problem. They are killing this breed. Killing it. The owners of these dogs may be friends of yours..but that doesn't mean you can close your eyes to what is happening to the breed you claim to love so much. For gods sake get a grip. It doesn't matter how long you have owned the breed. This is about the future - not the past.

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    4. And breeding out heart problems, joint problems, kidney problems, eye problems. Come on, every breeder needs to decide where to start and go from there. No one, even those who have been in the breed 10 years+ can breed for everything all at the same time. and they wouldn't need bigger lungs if they could take a fuller breath in the first place

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    5. question for Anon 12.09 Where does the poster say they have been breeding for 10 years. It may be an alien concept to most, but you can own a breed without ever breeding!!!

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    6. Anon 12.09. I have had DDB in my life for 10 years and believe it or not I have never bred a litter. Companions - no more. Is it so hard for you to believe? !!
      Of course I have - or had - breeders who were friends. Up and down this country. I have 5 DDB's at this moment. 4 of those are rescued dogs. 1 of those I bought and raised from a pup. She is the last one I would ever purchase. I have dealt with so many conditions over the years and of course these reputable (and I use the term loosely) breeders arent interested when things go wrong.
      I have one male who is an ex-stud dog. His bloodlines are fabulous. He is superb to look at - breathtakingly beautiful. From the front. He sired a few litters of puppies for a show kennels, before they decided that his puppies were sharing his weakness, and that is when he came to me. I paid for him to be neutered of course. His back legs resemble those of a penguin. He bunny hops everywhere. But he is a love. Not breeding quality - not fit for function. But he was bred never the less. More than 5 times. People even paid to use this dog. And to date I have not seen a worse rear end.
      Another female I have - an ex breeding female. Was that badly beaten by another reputable breeder with a riding crop that she would vomit in fear when she first came here. I have a female with a severe heart murmur - again used for breeding before she joined me. She is on medication daily. And a lovely little chap with failing kidneys. He is on a special diet and medication - for the moment it is under control but we take each day as it comes. His lifespan is not great - when he begins to decline I will have to release him from his fate.
      Ive always had a couple of sick dogs. Im not quite sure I remember what its like to not have to hand out daily meds!!!! Im happy to offer them a place in my home - but one thing is for sure. I have seen enough to put me off ever considering breeding a litter. To risk passing this heart ache onto another is something my soul couldnt justify.
      Of course over the years I have met a handful of fantastic breeders who do the best they can. Baby steps - but they are progressing the right way. In health I mean. But I have also seen the very worst. The worst seem to come highly recommended too. Accredited breeders some of them.
      I watched pedigree dogs exposed and I wished I had a hidden camera - that on the TV was nothing. Deep down most of you people know it. If you dont know it, then consider yourself lucky that you havent been as close to some as I have.
      I have no grudges with anyone. I care about the dogs. Deeply. I have asked the KC to investigate certain issues and they aren't interested. I guess the get too many bitter complaints that are false. They pay no attention when a real one comes in either.
      But it makes me sick to see heads buried in the sand. The breed is not under attack here - tight nostrils are a problem. Yes. They are. My female Renee that I bought as a puppy has tight nostrils too. She pants a lot - but she copes. There is no harm to say it. But then again I dont need to risk putting off any puppy buyers.
      Jemima would be more than welcome to come and take pictures of my dogs. Tight nostrils, penguin feed and all. More than welcome to glance in my medicine cabinet, read my vet reports from the last 10 years and even read some of the emails I have had from breeders over this period too.
      It isnt a bed of roses out there. Lets stop trying to fool the world.
      Im not really interested in petty arguments - Ive seen it and dealt with it. So have some of the people reading and commenting here. Some probably saw fit to dish a bit of it out.
      Some DDBs have tight nostrils. This is a fact. Stamp feet or not - get pictures removed or not - it doesnt change the nose on that face! Jemima has barely scratched the surface. It could of been much, much worse.

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    7. Thank you for sharing your story with us. It is both moving, and educational.

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  15. My Veteran dog is one of the pictures above, and nobody asked me if they could use his picture for this use. Myself and another person whose dog is shown above are seeing what action we can take.

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    1. Veteran - so in other words more than 7 years old? With this information it can change perception of a photo....

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    2. "My Veteran dog is one of the pictures above, and nobody asked me if they could use his picture for this use. Myself and another person whose dog is shown above are seeing what action we can take."

      You do realize that your dog was at a dog show and therefore any pictures taken of the dog is not illegal? You also do realize that almost all of these dogs look the same and no one would have guessed "slander" upon your dog had you not stood up on a baseless claim on your end, right?

      Either ground you try to stand on you have wet feet, anon 1053.

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  16. As a ddb owner and lover I thoroughly understand why these pics have been brought to light, these dogs do have tight nostrils unfortunately and the breed standard clearly states 'wide, open nostrils' which other dogues do portray. This beautiful breed is in a mess if we are all honest but unfortunately a lot of the more recent owner/breeders seem unable to accept that their dogues are not all perfect specimens, hence the large number of dogues that are pts or die before even reaching 12 months old. This breed can be saved if we accept criticism and recognise the faults and issues that we all hold within our own kennels, shutting our eyes to problems that are as plain as the nose on our face (or our dogues) will only send this breed even further into depriment

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  17. Editing photos Jemima? Not a good move. Why do you feel you have to do this? At the moment now this has been revealed you are looking very, very foolish.

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  18. Er, we haven't.

    Again. Endlessly. Boringly. We do not edit photos. I'm sure it suits some to think we do, but we don't. There's no point and, frankly, no need.

    Jemima

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    1. In Reply to Romany Dog saying how gullible we are in beleaving that this was an old eye injury, and not having a vet report present, does this mean that each and every little injury and scratch that a pup to adult dog may incure will have to have a vet report I dont know who is gullible. For one if this injury happened at a young age this injury could have been forgotton and before you all jump down my throat, things happen and we do forget. My son was born with a small heart mumour and we attended the hospital routinely till he was 2 when I was told this had healed. My son at the age of 16 broke his nose and had to have it re-built and when he was going down to theatre I was asked his health questions and if he had any heart problems I said no, they asked for example heart mumours etc. and at that point I remembered that he had, I had totally forgot that he had been born with a heart mumour, but if they had not mentioned the word mumour to me I would have let him go down to theatre and who knows what could have happened. Would I risk his life, No. So in answer to your disbelief in the Bulldog owner I dont think anything was done with intent, would they risk the outcome NO.

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  19. The photos have not been edited, unfortunately they are showing a true picture

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  20. May I just ask....How many dogue owners would have made the comments they have on here were there not the option to remain Anon?

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  21. I just LOVE how all these DBB come out of the woodwork, yet not ONE has the balls to sign their name to their posts. Not ONE. That alone says it all.

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  22. Well well well i am the owner of marley she was not over heated and i NEVER said she was over heated once ( even when i was asked 4 or 5 times by reporters ) yes the nec was very stuffy but there was 1000s of people and dogs in there ,yes the doors should be open ,yes there was other breeds of dogs panting yes panting shock horror !!!! yes some dogs die young in all breeds and cross breeds .Why do you feel the need to attack the dogues as a breed just because mine died ,it had nothing to do with the breed and NONE of the breeders and owners have heard of the condition .What i have read quickly is lots of quotes from american kc not ares they are completly differant .just leave it iam sorry you never got the story you wanted from MY DOGS DEATH so leave it alone and look at the puppy farms not attacking my freinds and fellow dogue owners

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    1. My condolences regarding Marlie. :-(

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  23. If I have given the impression that I think that overheating had anything to do with Marley's death, then you have my unreserved apologies.

    I thought I had stated quite clearly that Marley did not overheat (in fact the opposite) and I am not "attacking the breed just because mine died". I have written above that it was a tragic one-off, I corrected someone who thought it might be breed-related and this afternoon I have not published a great many other comments relating to Marley.

    I was really sorry to hear about Marley's death. It must have been just horrendous and my heart goes out to you.

    That doesn't take away the fact that I feel that Dogues would do better with wider nostrils but do appreciate that the reference to Marley could be seen an insensitive. As such, I have have removed it.

    Jemima

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  24. IF BUT ONE ANIMAL SUFFERS AT THE HAND OF A HUMAN WHO WILLINGLY TOOK THE RISK, WE HAVE FAILED AND NO LONGER DESERVE TO PLAY GOD WITH THE CREATURES OF THIS EARTH!!

    how on earth can anyone want to argue with a premise that is caring for the dogs you all claim to be fanciers of?!

    WAKE UP!!

    it's okay to be embarrassed about it! standards are changing!

    but battling with the lady who's trying to help YOU as well as your dogs, isn't gonna make you look very good, is it?!?

    and taking the photos is FINE, c'mon, i'm not gonna recognise the dog when out and about, there's no names attached, it's practically just pure scenery. photography is a hazard of the modern world i'm afraid, act accordingly and deal with it.

    I'm very sorry for the death of marley. my thoughts go out to you. all our dogs are our family.

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  25. Why have I read these comments about the DDB, I must be mad. I have not found one response to anon question about getting prior consent or authority from any of the dogs owners before displaying photos and making judgements on the breed standard. You are opportunistic, unfair and bias but I do belief the tide will change, little or no good will come out of this for the real people who have tried to conform to the new health checks. When the tide changes – you will be forgotten like a bad apple, I expect then horse racing will be on the agenda then.

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    1. THERE IS NO LEGAL NEED FOR PRIOR CONSENT!

      JEMIMA IS POSTING LEGALLY!

      If your dog were touted as a good example of its breed, you'd be overjoyed at seeing it in print and would have no problems having the photo used. Simply not liking what is said does not make her actions illegal.

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